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Santa Says Youth Basketball Drill

Posted on December 15, 2010 at 7:30 PM Comments comments (0)

It's fun and silly youth basketball drill... but it's also great for training

your kids to pay attention and listen to the coaches

instructions.



== Set Up ==


Spread your entire basketball team out on one side of the court.

Each basketball player should have two-arms length separation

from everyone else.


Coach stands at the front of the group with a Santa

Claus hat on.

(okay, if you're "too cool" to wear the Santa Hat, it's not

totally necessary :-)



== How It Works ==


The game is similar to "Simon Says."

Coach will call out an instruction.


If it's preceded by "Santa Says" - the basketball players should

follow the instruction.


If it's NOT preceded by "Santa Says" - the players should

hold tight and not do anything.

For example....


You can start out with some basic calls:

"Santa Says clap once!"


-> All the players should clap once


"Santa Says clap twice!"


-> All the players should clap twice


"Clap three times!"


-> You didn't say "Santa Says" that time, so all the players

should hold tight. Any players that do move are eliminated

from the game.

(they should shoot free throws on the side baskets while the

game finishes)


Continue with new instructions, trying to trap the kids into

making a mistake and being eliminated.


The last kid standing is the winner, and gets a small prize

for the honor.


The other kids get candy canes as the consolation prize.



== Variations ==


You can use this drill to practice any technical basketball skills

you want.


Start by demonstrating the skill, making corrections, and

making sure each player on your team gets it.


Then, test their knowledge and technique using Santa Says.


For example, here are some more suggested calls you can use

WITHOUT a ball.


"Santa Says defensive stance!"

"Santa Says box out!"

"Santa Says block the shot!"

"Santa Says slide to the left!" (or right/back/front)

"Santa Says set a screen!"

"Santa Says front pivot!"

"Santa Says reverse pivot!"

"Santa Says dive for a loose ball!"


==


Here are some calls you can use WITH a ball.

"Santa Says triple threat position!"

"Santa Says one quick dribble!"

"Santa Says two quick dribbles!"

"Santa Says dribble low!"

"Santa Says dribble high!"

"Santa Says left hand dribble!"

"Santa Says right hand dribble!"

"Santa Says crossover dribble!"

"Santa Says behind the back dribble!"

"Santa Says reverse dribble!"

"Santa Says power dribble!"

 


==


Try this if you want to work on form shooting.

"Santa Says balance!"

"Santa Says eyes on the rim!"

"Santa Says elbow up!"

"Santa Says follow through!"


==


This sequence works well for practicing new post moves:

"Santa Says drop step!"

"Santa Says up and under!"

"Santa Says jump hook!"


==


And so on. Be creative and have fun with it!

 


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Man to Man Basketball Drills

Posted on June 10, 2010 at 10:20 PM Comments comments (0)

Manager 1 on 1:


2 Managers/coaches (or chairs) stand 35 feet out from the baseline with one about 7 feet away from the sideline and the other  feet inside of that.

On coaches “Go”. the defensive player sprints to run around the chair/manager closest to the middle of the court while the offensive player runs dribbling the ball around the outside chair (closest to the sideline). Once around the chair, the offensive player attacks the rim and the two play 1 on 1.



Inside the Three 1 on 1:


Two players begin underneath the hoop. The defensive player begins with the ball and he dribbles to any spot inside the three point arc to place the ball down. Once the ball is placed down, the offense runs to pick it up and the two play 1 on 1 live.

You can control where you want this drill to happen if you make the defense put the bail only in the paint.



Turn and Run 1 on 1:


Drill starts like a zigzag bail handling defensive slide drill but the defense allows the offensive player to beat him off the dribble up the sideline. The defensive player works on his speed and recovery to get back in front and square up the offense. Once the defensive player gets in front of the offense, the ball handler throws the ball to a manager/coach at the top of the key. The defensive player jumps to the ball in Help side and  when the offensive player catches it again, the two play 1 on 1 live.



Baseball:


This is a 1 on 1 drill that uses two teams playing 1 on 1 vs members of the opposing team counting the score like a base ball game. Start from the top of the key with a member of team 1 guarding a member of team 2 – if the defense gets a stop. then that’s 1 Out. If the offense scores than they get 1 run and there are no outs. On the first foul, you re-check the ball.  On the second, the offense gets a point. When three outs are up. You switch offense defense. When each team has gone for 3 outs, then you have

just played one inning. You can do this drill from any spot on the court and can facilitate post players by allowing coaches to feed them w the post instead of playing 1 on 1 from the perimeter.

 


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Youth Basketball Two Minute Shooting Drill

Posted on May 28, 2010 at 3:50 PM Comments comments (0)

The Two Minute Drill is one of our favorite basketball shooting drills. It develops:


1. Ability to shoot free throws under pressure

2. Conditioning

3. Footwork coming off of a screen or cut

4. Three-point shooting

5. Mental Toughness/Competitiveness

6. Making shots under pressure


Basketball players are highly competitive people by nature; therefore it is beneficial to design baketball drills that provide an opportunity for players to compete against other players or against themselves. The competition increases the player's enthusiasm for the basketball shooting drill and results in better intensity during the training session.


The Two Minute Drill requires only one player. The players compete against themselves for their best score. However, it is extremely helpful to have someone timing the drill. Many players practice free throws by shooting 100, 200 or possibly more in each practice session.


While volume shooting is an important part of developing confidence and rhythm on free throws, this type of practice does not subject the player to the same conditions that exist while attempting free throws during a game. Pressure and fatigue are just two factors that may affect free throw percentage.


To be a successful free throw shooter in games, players must be able to step to the line a make two in a row while fatigued and under pressure. The Two Minute Drill is designed for player to do just that. Players must step to the free throw line and make two pressure free throws while fatigued.


The objective of the Two Minute Drill Game is for the player to move from level one to the highest level possible. In order to advance from one level to another, the player must make a power lay-up, a spin-and-catch intermediate shot and a three point shot.


The player must shoot until he/she has made each shot, even if s/he misses each one four times, the level is not completed until each of the three shots goes in. After making the three-point shot the player immediately (with no rest!) steps to the free throw line to shoot a one-and-one free throw.


If the player makes both free throws he/she advances to the next level and repeats the same sequence. If the player misses a free throw he/she must remain on that level. The drill is timed for two minutes. The stopwatch only runs while the player is shooting shots from the field, like a game.


It does not run during free throws. If there is no one to time the player can wear a sport watch to time him/herself. The timing of the drill is very significant to its effectiveness because the clock pushes the player to run hard after rebounds and to shoot shots that are more game-like.


However, if no timer is available, the player must push him/herself to go hard. To make it competitive, the shooter can be limited to a total number of misses or to commit that the first missed free throw will end the game. Players compete each practice session against the highest level they have ever achieved.


They may also compete against other players by seeing which player reaches the highest level in a given amount of time. The game may be altered to more benefit to post players.


Post players may choose to substitute the three-point shots or the intermediate shots with jump hooks or other post moves. It is easy to come up with several other variations to keep the drill from becoming monotonous.

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Fast Break Outlet Passing Drill

Posted on May 14, 2010 at 8:30 PM Comments comments (0)

This drill encourages players to look up the floor and pass, rather than dribbling. You develop skills for rebounding, pivoting, jump stops, bounce and chest passes, lay-ups, power and speed dribble.

 


We like this drill because it utilizes so many skills and keeps our team moving up and down the court. We also turn it into a team competition against the clock that encourages everyone to work together. Instructions


Set up: two balls needed. Divide your team into four or five equal groups (if you have extra players put them by basket in rebounding line). Start the first near the basket in rebounding position with the rest in a zig-zag pattern down the court (The first group is under the basket, second group takes the outlet pass near the side line about half way to the half court line. The third group should be on the other side of the half court line on the opposite side and the final group at the free throw line extended). should be a group near the half court line and a group .


Coach takes shot or throws the ball off the backboard.


3 rebounds the ball passes to 5.


3 follows his pass to the next line.


5 comes toward the ball, jump stops ,pivots, passes up the court to 7 and follows the pass to the next line.


7 comes toward the ball, jump stops ,pivots, passes up the court to 9 and follows the pass to the next line.


9 comes toward the ball, jump stops ,pivots, and dribbles towards the hoop for the lay up. After the lay up, the next group starts.


9 grabs the rebound and power dribbles to the sideline then speed dribbles down court, coming to a jump stop on the sideline at the foul line extended. The player passes the ball back to the coach and returns to the rebounding line. Points of Emphasis:



Variations:


  • Allow two or three dribbles before each pass.
  • Compete against clock to make a certain number of lay-ups in three minutes.
  • Move last line to baseline or foul-line extended by three point line.
  • Player cuts, catches pass at foul line, squares to bucket and shoots jump shot.
  • Remove the coach. When the power dribbler reaches the three-point line, she dribble drives to the elbow, pulling up for a jump shot. Player under basket rebounds the shot and passes to outlet.


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Basketball Rebounding; New York Knicks Style

Posted on April 20, 2010 at 12:18 AM Comments comments (0)

This is a great basketball rebounding drill named after the New York Knicks NBA Basketball team.


The Knicks Drill


(1 or 2 basketballs. 6 or more players)

On the shot by the number 3 (could be a coach),  Xl and X4 come out and box out (they start with one foot on the baseline).


Offensive players 1 and 5 are going hard to the rim. Numbers 2 and 4 are there for the outlet pass. If the defense gets the rebound they are going to pivot to the outside and outlet the ball. If it’s a made shot. they run out of bounds to outlet the basketball. The offense players try to stop the outlet pass. You could have one player deny the inbounder and the other denying the player receiving the pass.


The New York Kicks have used this drill in a variaty of ways and you can find more fundemental drills like this at thier summer camps and basketball workshops. If you want to see some of these principals in action, then purchase some Knicks basketball tickets and go see them in person. The other variations to this drill are...


If the offense gets the rebound they go 2 on 2 and try to score or the drill can be reset (coach’s option).


Offensive players switch between being offense or outlet players. The defense remains defense until you switch them out.


Try to match up the lines with perimeter players in one line and post players in the other.

This could be a competition drill with sprints for the losers. A defensive rebound is one point. a successful outlet pass is one point, an offensive rebound is two points and a made basket is one point.


The Defenders can cross and block out opposite line to vary the drill.




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Basketball Rebounding; War Drill

Posted on April 20, 2010 at 12:16 AM Comments comments (0)

War Drill (8 minute drill)


(1 basketball. 6. 8 or 10 players. Full Court)


Defense is in the paint and matches up. On the shot by the coach. their goal is to go meet the offense outside of the paint and keep them out of it.


The offensive players are set up behind the three point line and except for the point guard, (who gets back on defense), are going hard to the rim.  The defender on the point guard should look to help on boxing someone else out.


This is a highly competitive drill with a winner and loser. If the offense gets the rebound they get a point and can try to score a 2 or 3 pointer.  If they score we set the drill back up. If the defense gets the rebound or forces a turnover, there is no point scored but they push the basketball down court (transition offense) and try to score on the other end. On a score or turnover by them, play stops and we set the drill back up.


The ball will only go from one end to the other end one time and then the drill would be reset. If we don’t reset the drill it becomes a transition drill and not a contact drill.

There are no points on a made shot by the coach but it is still played like a rebound.

 


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Transition Shooting Basketball Drill

Posted on April 9, 2010 at 6:22 PM Comments comments (0)

One of the most neglected skill areas I see is shooting

in transition.


Yes... your first goal should be to get all the way

to the bucket for a layup.


But transition play will also get you lots of open threes.

If you have high percentage shooters - tell them to take

those shots!


One great way to work on this skill is a drill called

5 Ball Transition Shooting Basketball Drill.  This video shows you how to run it:


You need Adobe Flash Player to view this content.



Shooting in transition takes practice, as many players

have the tendency to drift forward and shoot long.


Tell your players to step into the pass and square up

befor releasing.



 


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Basketball Dribbling Drills and Aids

Posted on March 25, 2010 at 3:43 PM Comments comments (0)

 

Hopefully you had a chance to go through our last email, in which

we revealed the four things you must do to be a great ball-handler...

 


And we also gave you 2 excellent training aids that you can use to

improve your handles as quickly as possible. These training aids

are the "Naypalm Dribbling Aid" and the "Dribble Specs"...

 


Today, we wanna share a couple of awesome ball handling drills that

you can start doing right away. These drills will help improve

much-needed areas in your dribbling. They are as follows:

 


1) Figure 8 Dribbling: Dribble the ball as quickly as possible in a

figure 8 through and around the legs. Use the fingers when you

dribble, and dribble very low and quickly. Switch from the right to

the left and back to the right. Example: start with the right hand

dribbling the ball in front and then dribble through your legs with

your right hand, switch to your left hand and dribble from the

back, around your left side to the front and back through you

legs... then switch to your right hand behind the body and around

the right side. Try to go as fast as possible, and your dribbling

skills will improve with daily practice.

 


2) Up and Downs: Dribble the ball in front of you about waist high.

Then dribble the ball harder and harder until you're bouncing the

ball above your head, without jumping. Then gradually dribble the

ball lower and lower until its only bouncing one or two inches from

the ground. You'll have to kneel down or bend over to dribble

the ball that low. Pound the ball as quickly as possible when

you're low. The key is speed.

 


*Important Notes*:

 


- To be an outstanding ball-handler, we've already mentioned that

you MUST keep your heads and eyes up. NEVER dribble with your head

down.

 


- Staying low and dribbling the ball quickly is very important.

This helps you be a lot quickler off the dribble.

 


- Controlling the ball with your fingers is key...

 


==>> If you want to develop amazing finger control and strength,

and learn how to dribble the ball without ever looking down, then

check out the "Naypalm Dribbling Aid" and the "Dribble Specs"...

 


We mentioned the Naypalm and Dribble Specs in our last email to

you. If you haven't taken a look at them...you're really missing

out. Doing the above two ball handling drills with the Naypalm and


Dribble Specs will help you get much BETTER results, much FASTER...

Infact, any ball handling drill can be greatly enhanced with these

highly r.ecommended training aids:


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Pressure Free Trhow Drill

Posted on March 1, 2010 at 6:13 PM Comments comments (0)

This drill simulates pressure free throws at the end of a game and emphasizes the damage done by missing free throws late in a close game.

 

 


Run the drill at the end of practice to more closely simulate the mental and physical fatigue form the end of a game.

 


Line up the team in the lane spaces and behind the arc as they would for a free throw attempt. The shooter gets a 1-1 opportunity. Put a realistic score on the scoreboard that you would have in the final minutes of a close tournament game.

 


We put the score on the scoreboard at 45-44 for high school varsity with our team leading by one. If the shooter makes the shot, your team gets one point added. If the shooter misses, the opponent gets two points added. That emphasized the importance of each miss.


After one shooter is done, rotate until each player has had a chance to shoot.

 

If you win the game, practice ends on a positive note. If you lose, there needs to be a penalty such as running, frozen push ups, or whatever you want to use.

 


Some adjustments you can make to make the game more challenging are:

 

If the first shot of the one and one is missed, count it as two misses since the player does not even get the second shot. That would be 4 points for the imaginary opponent.


Start off with the score tied rather than you being ahead. Ithink that takes away from the protecting the lead theme, but if youobviously are going to get fouled with a tie game at times, especiallyif you attack the basket.Startout behind by a few points to emphasize attacking the basket late inthe game to get fouled and catch up with the clock stopped.


Run sprints prior to or between the free throw attempts

Some adjustments you can make to adapt this drill to make it competitive but realistic for younger level teams:

 


Start out with a bigger lead Shoot two shots rather than a one and one each time Each miss is only one point for the imaginary opponent.

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Basketball Drill; Numbers Drill

Posted on March 1, 2010 at 4:00 PM Comments comments (0)

It's called the "Numbers" drill, and it's a great

way of injecting some fun and competition into

your practices.

============

HOW IT WORKS

============

Start by having each player on your team pair up

with another player of similar size and ability.

Give each pair a number, then split the pairs into

two groups.

So, if you have 12 players on your team, you'll

end up with six players on each side.

Group A will have a player labeled 1, 2, 3, 4, 5,

and 6.

And Group B will also have a player labeled 1, 2,

3, 4, 5, and 6.

Have Group A stand on the baseline to the right of

basket, and Group B stand on the baseline to the

left of the basket.

Coach stands in under the basket with one basketball.

To start the drill, roll the ball very slowly out

toward half court.

After a few seconds, yell out any number from 1-6.

The two players with that number (one from Group A

and one from Group B) will sprint out to retrieve the

ball as fast as they can.

Once the ball is retrieved, they play a short game

of one on one until the offensive player scores or

the defensive player gets the ball.

So for example, if you yell out "3!"

... the two players with number 3 assigned to them

will immediately hustle to the ball, then play the

quick one on one game.

The focus of this drill is on:

1) Competitiveness

2) Toughness

3) Aggression

There is no "out of bounds" and (if your players can

handle it) no fouls or violations called either.

=======

SCORING

=======

Whichever player reaches the ball first gets one

point for their team automatically.

If the offensive player scores, his team gets one

point.

If the offensive player gets an offensive rebound,

his team gets one point.

If the defensive player gets a steal or rebound,

his team gets one point.

First team to 11 wins.

========

VARATIONS

========

Once your players master the basics, you can spice

this drill up with a few variations.

1) Try calling out multiple numbers at once.

For example, yelling out "35!" would send both the

#3 players and the #5 players to fight for the ball.

Once one team gets possession, they play a quick

two on two game.

You can even send three or four players out at one

time if you like by calling "125!" or "356!"

2) Try awarding points for diving on the floor, taking

charges, or taking it strong to the basket

 


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Basketball Defensive Slide Drill

Posted on February 13, 2010 at 6:23 PM Comments comments (0)

THE DEFENSIVE "SLIDE" DRILL

 


- Here's a great drill to become a better defender. Start underneath the

basket, and run to the free throw line under control. As you

approach the free throw line, slow down, and get under control and

ready to slide (this is "closing out" on the offensive player).


 

Once you're at the free-throw line, slide to the right side of the

court by quickly moving side-to-side. You're NOT moving forward, you're

moving sideways. The goal is to move your feet as quickly as possible

without overlapping one foot over the other. Once you finish

sliding to the right-side of the court, slide back all the way to

the left side of the court, and repeat this drill until you get

tired.

 


You'll be surprised at how much better just this one drill will make

you at defense, because it teaches you to run and close-out a defender

under control, slide your feet, and improve your overall conditioning.

 

Remember to stay low, and you'll really work your thighs and calves.

 


There are so MANY more important defensive tips and drills

that you need to know to become a super-tough defender....


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Basketball Dribble Sequence Drill

Posted on February 13, 2010 at 6:07 PM Comments comments (0)

DRIBBLE SEQUENCE DRILL

 


While every young player starting out probably envisions him/herself as the next basketball super hero, they need to start with good basics. The skill of dribbling requires control over the ball while moving the body in a purposeful way for the position being played.  Perimeter players need more dribbling skills than inside players do.  Point guards need more dribbling talent than the rest.  Dribbling skills,like passing skills, will determine a lot about the position a player plays at and the amount of playing time a player receives.


 

Have the players line up on the end line.  Have them move slowly up the floor, on the dribble. On the whistle, continue dribbling while stopping, going into a protective stance.  On the next whistle, switch dribble hands and continue.  At each stop, the player goes into a protective stance (A space between the feet I call the protective“cup”.  The ball is only being dribbled knee high while the player is in a low, wide stance, angled slightly sideways in the direction of the dribble.


  The back is nearly straight.  What we don’t want is the player leaning over the ball. Balance is directly down from the buttocks, midway between the feet and evenly distributed on both feet.   The arm not being used to dribble is between the ball and the defender, acting as a deterrent to reaching in.  Eyes are up--watching the defender, not the ball) 

 

On each start, the player will have switched dribble hands and go back to an open court dribble.  This alternating action simulates having no pressure on the open court and then meeting the pressure of defense. Watch for balance, foot placement, body angle, correct dribbling hand for the direction heading, back angle, dribble height, etc.  I do thisdrill at all levels of ability!

 

To practice straight-ahead control, at all levels of ability, put the players through a floor touching drill.  At the whistle, players stop, go into a protect stance, keeping the ball live, touch the floor with the non-dribbling hand.  On the next whistle, players switch hands and go back toward the start line.  At the next whistle, they change directions again, using the other hand to dribble and head up court again.  Constant starting and stopping, the speed of the open court dribble and the stopping in the protective stance all work to develop confidence, balance and control.

 

Two variations off this are, to use the lines as automatic stop points(no whistle)—free throw line (extended across the floor), mid-court,far free throw and the far end line.  There would be no turning back in this first drill.  It could be done up and back as many times as the coach demands.  The second variation uses the turning back in the direction from which the dribbler came, after the line touch.  Then, on the next sequence, the dribbler would pass the last line of stop and continue to the next line.  At each stop, the dribbler would only go back to the last turn-around point.  This drill is exactly the same as the time-worn, line drill, but done with the ball.



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How To Plan Youth Basketball Drills

Posted on February 2, 2010 at 5:24 PM Comments comments (0)

When planning youth basketball drills you should take the following two points into consideration;


1. Consider whether or not the drill is useful for your team and

your system. Some drills look great but don't really fit well with

your system. Some require more resources (baskets, balls, players,

or coaches) than you have available. Some utilize your resources

less efficiently than others.

 


2. Consider the important fundamentals

that the drill develops and be ready to teach them when you use

the drill. Drills provide the framework for you to teach.

Running drills just to run drills is usually a

waste of time. Focus on the important teaching points with every

drill that you run.


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5 Man Basketball Rebounding Drill

Posted on January 19, 2010 at 6:20 PM Comments comments (2)


RULES:


1.) Put 5 defenders in line right under the rim facing half court.


2.) Place 5 offensive players on the perimeter. Put a player in each corner, each wing, and one at the point.


3.) The coach shoots the ball from different spots on the floor.


4.) When the shot is taken the defenders rush out to block out theoffensiver players. If they get the defensive rebound the get 1 POINTand pass the ball to the coach and go back to their original positions.


5.) If the offense gets a rebound they get 1 Point and must put theshot right back up and if they make the shot they get another point.They have to put the ball right back up they cannot take it back uptop. Every time the offense gets a rebound they get a point.


6.) You play to the first team getting 10 points. Losers run! (You can have either an offensive or defensive winner.

 


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1 ON 1 YOUTH BASKETBALL DRILL

Posted on January 11, 2010 at 6:40 PM Comments comments (0)

Take a look at this effective youth basketball drill from coach Jerry Petitgoue It's PERFECT for injecting some fun competition into your Youth Basketball Practices. In this one drill, your kids will learn...


* How to close out on defense


* How to shoot it from 12 feet out


* How to box out


* How to use an up fake to get open


And a lot more. This is one of my favorites with my 11-12 year old team.


Take a look...

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Have your players start out under the basket forming two lines at the point where the baseline meets the both lanes. One offense line and one defense line with the coach in the middle of the lane on the baseline.


This youth basketball drill starts out with the coach rolling the ball to the free throw line. The offensive player recovers the ball around the free throw line and then attempts a dribble drive move and jump shot.


The defensive player must slide from one block to the other after the coach starts play and then quickly run to close out the offensive player as they pick up the ball.


Once the shot is made the drill continues as the defensive player boxes out the offensive player and they fight for the rebound.


Each player goes to the other line and the next players start the process all over again.

 


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7 Years and Under Youth Basketball Coaching Tips

Posted on January 11, 2010 at 5:21 PM Comments comments (0)

 

I get letters all the time from new coaches of very young playerswanting to know where to begin with these kids.  They ask about drills,about zone vs. man-to-man defenses and offenses for 5 and 6 yearolds—Offenses for 5 & 6 year olds??  This age, they’re lucky toknow which side of the ball is up!

 


Young kids probably know nothing of the game—the rules, the lines onthe floor, player positions, and more.  So, here’s some of what I useto enlighten these novice coaches.

 

They may not say it, but every player, parent and coach new tobasketball wants to know how it all works—how everything fits together.

 


The game moves so quickly, the transitions from offense to defense andback again can be a blur, and the interplay between the five members ofa team can be an enigma.

 

If you’re the parent or coach of a child new to the game, please don’tassume that they understand the game.  Take whatever time is necessaryto ensure that each child understands the words that describe the game,the action and the rules.  It will give them confidence to get startedand keep their frustration level down.  Remember that what one childmay understand another may not.

 


Walk around the floor with them and point out the lines.  Tell thechild what the lines are called and what they’re for.  Bring up rulesthat have to do with the floor.  Point out the locations of the“elbows”, the “low block”, the “lane”.  Point out the key, the point,the wings, front-court, back-court and talk about the playing positionsassociated with play in these areas.

 


Talk about the positions of the players and the unique talentsassociated with playing the point guard position, at shooting guard,small forward, power forward and the center in the post.  Talk aboutthe play at the point, on the wings and at the high, mid and low post. All the things these players do can be confusing, so clarify terms likeback door, slash, flash, penetration, screen and roll, give and go,power moves, pivot, denying the pass, fronting the cutter, etc., etc.

  

Description:01= Sideline  02= Endline  03= Midcourt line  04= Imaginarydividing line  05= FT line extended  06= FT line  07= 3-pt. line  08=Elbow (corners on both sides)  09= Nail (mid. pt. FT line)  10= Jumpball circle  11= Lane, 3-sec. area, post  12= Wing area (both sides) 13= Point area (top of circle)  14= Low post block (both sides)




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How To Be A Dominating Basektball Defense Player

Posted on December 31, 2009 at 1:18 PM Comments comments (0)

It doesn't matter how good your offense is, if you're not

defensively sound, you WILL be the "bench warmer" for

your team.

 


Believe it or not, coaches do care about defense more than offense.

 

Coaches know that the key to winning is slowing down and stopping

the other teams' star players.

 


Now, you don't need to constantly steal the ball from them, or

block all their shots to be an effective defensive player.

 

Simply being able to stay infront of him/her and force them into

tough, low percentage shots does the trick.

 


The key here is to make your man work extremely hard to get off a

shot.  Your mind set should be to wear him out and make him tired.

 

Even if he/she starts out hitting those tough shots, it doesn't

matter. As the game progresses, the amount of work, and energy they had to

use will show its effects.

 


Now, realize that all this is only possible if you're able to stay

infront of your man.

 


Let's take a look at some of the things you can do to stay in front

of your man...

 


TIP: Keep your eyes on the defender's abs.

 


=> No matter what fake the offensive player performs, they can only

go where their abs take them.

 


TIP: Play defense with your feet not your hands.

 

=> Don't be lazy, you need to move your feet.  Reaching aimlessly

with your hands will only lead to pointless fouls.

 


TIP: Go for the steal on the up-bounce.

 

=> This is when the ball is moving the slowest, and when your

player has the least control.

 


TIP: Get low.

 

=> When in your defensive stance make sure to get low and wide,

while staying on the balls of your feet. This will maximize your

ability to stay in front of your defender and not let him blow past

you.

 


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THE DEFENSIVE "SLIDE" DRILL

 


- Here's a great drill to become a better defender. Start underneath the

basket, and run to the free throw line under control. As you

approach the free throw line, slow down, and get under control and

ready to slide (this is "closing out" on the offensive player).

 


Once you're at the free-throw line, slide to the right side of the

court by quickly moving side-to-side. You're NOT moving forward, you're

moving sideways. The goal is to move your feet as quickly as possible

without overlapping one foot over the other. Once you finish

sliding to the right-side of the court, slide back all the way to

the left side of the court, and repeat this drill until you get

tired.

 


You'll be surprised at how much better just this one drill will make

you at defense, because it teaches you to run and close-out a defender

under control, slide your feet, and improve your overall conditioning.

 

Remember to stay low, and you'll really work your thighs and calves.

 


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Horse, A Classic Basketball Game

Posted on December 24, 2009 at 11:48 AM Comments comments (0)

Playing the basketball game of horse may be insignificant to some, however, I disagree. One of the all time favorite drive way basketball games, Horse has been around almost as long as basketball it self and can be sometimes over looked as a serious drill or tool to develop basketball skill sets.


Playing H.O.R.S.E. can help a basketball player define or increase his/her limits on the court by testing their dribbling, shooting and hand to eye cordination in ways that are not possible with traditional basketball drills and basketball training methods.


Obviously basketball trick shots are not going to be the norm in a real basketball game and any basketball player that chooses to take such shots with out justification will probably not get much playing time , however there are opportunitis on the basketball floor where a player can create an advantage offensively by knowing how to react when the defense forces an untraditional look at the basket.


For example if your driving to the basket baseline with the shot clock running down and your trapped behind the back board, you have to make some attempt at shooting the basketball or you will force a turnover. Using the game of H.O.R.S.E. as training tool for such unconventional shots can put points on the board.


What some call a childish game of H.O.R.S.E  has been used by some of the top NBA basketball players over the years. Take a look at this video of Pistol Pete Maravich and the H.O.R.S.E national championship


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5 on 5 Basketball No Dribble Drill

Posted on December 22, 2009 at 1:05 PM Comments comments (0)

This is an excellent basketball drill for forcing your players to move with out the ball and a great venue for teaching basketball V cuts and L cuts.


The following  5 on 5  No-Dribble Scrimmage drill  is the best tool I have for improving motion offense movement.Since the The offense cannot dribble the ball, they are forced to execute cuts and screens in order to run the offense.


This is also a great basketball drill for teaching screeners to locate bodies when they screen (headhunt)Teaching players getting screened to set up the screens and rub shoulders with the screener.


Teaching players not to stand on the perimeter – if a player isn’t open the drill forces him to cut or screen away .Teaching ball handlers to face the basket and create space when they catch the basketball.Ball-movement – the ball should change sides of the floor several times Enjoy:


Purpose: Thist eaches players to execute the continuity offense without the use of the dribble. The goal of the drill is not to score, but to complete asmany passes as possible. Since the offense cannot dribble, the players without the ball must quickly and properly set and use screens to move the ball.


Players are also required to catch the ball in the proper areas in the offense. If a player should catch the ball on the wing, he must catch it on the wing in the scoring area instead of coming out of the scoring area to catch the ball. This drill has proven especially valuable because it demands precision and quickness under pressure. Ideally this carries over to games and allows players to properly execute against great quickness and pressure.


Organization: 5 players on offense and 5 on defense. The point guard starts with the ball.



Procedure:


1. The offense completes as many passes as it can without the ball hitting the ground while the defense overplays, looking to deflect or steal the ball.


2. Each team gets 3 possessions. The total amount of passes completed in 3 possessions is their final score.


3. Possession is also lost if a player catches the ball out of position. If a player isn‟t open he should not come out of position to receive the ball, he should go away and set a screen.


4. Possession is also lost on a 5 second count.


5. Defenders cannot switch on screens.



Coaching Points:


1. Screeners should screen bodies.They should “headhunt” and set the screen on a man. Players often fall into the habit of going to a predetermined spot and “screening air”making it difficult for the man receiving the screen to free himself.


2. Players must influence before coming off screens. This is done by taking a step or two away from the screen to set up the defender, then cutting back to come off the screen. Taking the defender away from the screen often forces the defender into errors, especially if they react strongly to the fake.


3. Players should rub shoulders on screens. The man coming off the screen rubs shoulders with the screener, leaving no gap between himself and his teammate for the defender to get through.


4. If a player comes off a screen but is overplayed and cannot receive a pass, he re-screens,

going away from the ball and screening for another teammate.


5. Players with the ball assume triple threat position and make a jab step to prevent the defense from guarding too closely. Always avoid turning away from the basket to protect the ball.


6. Offense should always look to reverse the ball. This forces the defense to work much harder than if the ball stays on one side of the floor.


7. The defense should try hard to deny all passes to end the offense‟s possession.


8. Defender‟s follow the rules of man to man defense, jumping to the ball. This makes it much easier to fight through screens.


 



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Youth Basketball Fast Break Drill

Posted on December 17, 2009 at 1:21 PM Comments comments (0)

Drills are the backbone of every practice.

 

Without'em you're left with a bunch of guys simply

hangin' out...not improving...not working on their

games...and showing the same weaknesses.

 


The whole point of having practice is to improve.

And the only way to improve is to use drills

that are fun, challenging, and most importantly,

help your guys/girls improve!

 


The 1st step is to identify what your team needs

to work on, or what their weaknesses are.

 


One thing that EVERY team can benefit from is better

passing. Good passing allows your team to score points

with less energy, because its the quickest and most

effective way to get the ball from player to player.

 



Full Court Fast Break Offense/Defense Dril


1) This is a full court 3 on 3 drill. You

divide the floor into 3 lanes.

 


2) 3 players are on offense, and 3 players

are on defense. You need a total of 6 players.

 


3) One player has the ball in the middle of the

floor. The other 2 players on offense take the

outside lanes.

 


4) Each player stays in the same lane the

entire drill. You want to advance the

basketball against the defensive players

without turning it over.

 


5) After each catch you're allowed one dribble.

You can't use skip (long) passes. You can't use

lob (overhead) passes. The only passess allowed

are strong chest passes and crisp bounce passes.



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